Science Events

starry sky

Rising Stars 2019

This event is an opportunity to showcase the breadth of research that takes place within the Faculty of Science.

  • Categories: Faculty of Science
  • Audiences: PublicDonors
14Aug
Dr Talitha Santini

Science Exchange - Trash to Treasure

Dr Talitha Santini will take you on a visual journey and present the promising pathways being explored by UWA researchers for improved remediation and reuse of mine waste.

  • Categories: Online
  • Audiences: Business IndustryCurrent studentsFuture studentsPostgraduatePublicResearchStaff
21May
Dr Sam Illingworth

Science Exchange - The Poetry of Science

Dr Sam Illingworth will introduce you to how poetry can be used to develop dialogue between scientists and non-scientists, leading to creative solutions to developing inclusive research governance for all.

  • Categories: Online
  • Audiences: Business IndustryCurrent studentsFuture studentsPostgraduatePublicResearchStaff
28May
What can I do with my drone

Science Exchange - What can I actually do with my drone?

Drone use has grown faster than a global pandemic! As a society we have come to appreciate drones and remote sensors as affordable tools that enable high resolution and on-demand data collection.

  • Categories: Online
  • Audiences: Business IndustryCurrent studentsFuture studentsPostgraduatePublicResearchStaff
4Jun
Brady Johnston

Science Exchange - Visualising a Virus

When dealing with the strange nanoscopic world that is simply too small to see, experiments and data visualisation approaches are vitally important to our understanding of life on this scale.

  • Categories: Online
  • Audiences: Business IndustryCurrent studentsFuture studentsPostgraduatePublicResearchStaff
16Jun
Dr Jeff Hansen

Science Exchange - Where did the beach go?

West Australian beaches have had a rough start to winter with many looking narrower than they have been in some years as a result of recent storms. Many of us who visit our local WA beaches may wonder how and why our coastlines change shape so dramatically throughout the seasons.

  • Categories: Online
  • Audiences: Business IndustryCurrent studentsFuture studentsPostgraduatePublicResearchStaff
18Jun
Dr Jemma Collova

Science Exchange - First Impressions and Why They Matter

Don’t judge a book by its cover. Appearances can be deceiving. Despite these warnings, evidence shows that people can’t help but make rapid judgements of character based on a mere glimpse of a stranger’s face. These impressions really matter because they predict all sorts of social outcomes. For instance, children who look attractive are assumed to be smart by teachers, and are less likely to receive harsh discipline.

  • Categories: Online
  • Audiences: Business IndustryCurrent studentsFuture studentsPostgraduatePublicResearchStaff
23Jun
Professor Amanda Salis

Science Exchange - The Science of Weight Loss

When it comes to the dietary treatment of obesity, ‘slow and steady’ has long been recommended. However, new research demonstrates that compared to slow weight loss, fast weight loss leads to greater average loss of weight and fat, both in the short-term and in the long-term.

  • Categories: Online
  • Audiences: Business IndustryCurrent studentsFuture studentsPostgraduatePublicResearchStaff
25Jun
Barley crop after a hot wind

Science Exchange - Cropping in a changing climate

From Geraldton to Esperance, the South-West of WA has experienced increasingly variable climate conditions for over a century. With increasingly drier winters and warmer, wetter summers affecting our state’s cropping industry; we need to gather and integrate knowledge from across Science to understand how best to respond to the challenges ahead.

  • Categories: Online
  • Audiences: Business IndustryCurrent studentsFuture studentsPostgraduatePublicResearchStaff
30Jun
Prof Myra Keep and PhD candidate Sean Standen

Science Exchange - Cake! and Earthquakes

Why do we have earthquakes in WA? Why do they happen more in some areas and not at all in others? WA is a long way from a tectonic plate boundary, so our earthquakes are different in nature to those in places like California, Indonesia or Japan.

  • Categories: Online
  • Audiences: Business IndustryCurrent studentsFuture studentsPostgraduatePublicResearchStaff
7Jul